UNREFINED CANE SUGARS

UNREFINED CANE SUGAR

aka whole cane sugar, panela (Colombia), rapadura (in Brazil) 

piloncillo (in Mexico), jaggery (in India)

kokuto (in Japan), muscovado (in the Philippines)

  • Cane Sugar means any type of product derived, directly or indirectly, from cane; they may be refiend, raw, or unrefined

  • All cane sugars available to you are refined; the least refined of all cane sugars are the so-called unrefined sugar

  • Unrefined sugars are produced in cane growing countries only, in a Sugar Mill, which is always located close to cane fields

  • Some are 'traditional artisan sugars' as they are produced in small batches around the world using hundreds of years old know-how

  • They have many different local names worldwide, such as muscovado, piloncillo, jaggery, rapadura, kokuto, and panela

  • The refining process used vary with the manufacturer, but it always envolve collecting cane juice, clarifying it, and boiling its water off

  • Unrefined sugars are typically not centrifuged to remove the cane molasses at any stage during their refining

  • They retain all or most of the cane molasses around the sugar crystals, resulting in 8 to14 percent molasses content

  • With a strong molasses flavor and brown color, they are substitutes for regular refined brown sugars but offer a more complex flavor

  • A typical unrefined cane sugar contains around 90 percent sucrose and 4 percent invert sugar (glucose and fructose)

  • Sold in liquid form (syrups, molasses) & in dry form (granulated, bricks, cones, blocks), which are often grated or chopped before use

  • Unrefined sugar is NOT healthier or nutritionally superior to raw sugar, and to white sugar (table sugar) or other refined sugars.

Traditional Cane Syrup
Traditional cane syrups & molasses are produced close to cane fields by slow simmering clarified cane juice in open kettles. They are not a by-product of the cane sugar refining process as they do not have sugar crystals removed from them.
Traditional Cane Molasses
Traditional cane syrups & molasses are produced close to cane fields by slow simmering clarified cane juice in open kettles. They are not a by-product of the cane sugar refining process as they do not have sugar crystals removed from them.
The Real Unrefined Cane Sugar
The only real unrefined cane sugar you can have is if you chew the fresh peeled fibrous stalk of cane which is filled with sap.
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Unrefined Cane Sugar
Three types of cane sugar are produced: unrefined, raw and refined sugar. The least refined are the so-called 'unrefined', such as muscovado and Sucanat.
Dark Muscovado
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Light Muscovado
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Panela
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Piloncillo
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Okinawa Kokuto
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
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ORGANIC UNREFINED SUGAR

  • A typical unrefined cane sugar contains around 90 percent sucrose and 4 percent invert sugar (glucose plus fructose)

  • Unrefined sugars are typically not centrifuged to remove the cane molasses at any stage during their refining

  • They retain all or most of the cane molasses around the sugar crystals, resulting in 8 to14 percent molasses content

  • With a strong molasses flavor and brown color, they are substitutes for regular refined brown sugars but offer a more complex flavor

  • Read two of my blog posts: What is Unrefined Sugar, Anyway?  and  Cane Sugar: Refined versus Raw versus Unrefined 

Organic | Whole Cane Sugar
Whole cane sugar refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
As cane juice is concentrated, a sticky dark syrup, called cane molasses, surrounds the pure sugar (sucrose) crystals. The color of the resulting brown sugars depends on the amount of the molasses they retain.
Organic Sucanat
Sucanat, which stands for Sugar Cane Natural, is not a traditional brown sugar, but it is an unrefined cane sugar produced by a drying process developed by the Swiss company Pronatec.
Sucanat is a registered trademark of Wholesome Sweeteners Inc, from Sugar Land, TX.
Organic Traditional Sugar | Solid
Sugars manufacturers & suppliers call 'unrefined cane sugar', any type of cane sugar that retains most of the original cane molasses around the sucrose crystals.
But be aware: All cane sugars available to consumers are refined and processed. The so-called 'Unrefined cane sugars' go through a great deal of processing and are refined, but less than white sugars.
Organic Traditional Sugar | Ground
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
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Copyright © 2020   WhatSugar Blog | By Adriane Mulinari Campos 

Everywhere in the USA | Based in Richmond,VA | Email me at info@whatsugar.com

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