MONK FRUIT

aka luo han guo fruit

  • On my quest to discover all zero-calorie monk fruit sweeteners available to you on store shelves, I found about 80 products

  • Tabletop sweeteners commonly known as Monk Fruit contain extracts from the fruit of the plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle

  • The plant is a perennial vine of the cucumber and melon family; China is the only grower of monk fruit plant 

  • The fruit has the size and shape of a lemon; chemically speaking, the sweet components extracted from it are called mogrosides

  • A variety of mogrosides (named I, II, III, IV, V, and VI) are present in amounts that vary from 0.5 to 1% in the dried fruit

  • Mogroside V is the major sweet component in monk fruit extracts from ripened fruits and is also the sweetest of all

  • Mogroside V is 100 to 250x sweeter than table sugar, and so, is used in small amounts, in a tiny volume and weight

  • According to a producer, with a farm and processing facilities in Guilin, almost 85 pounds of monk fruit produce 1 pound of extract

  • The color & flavor of the extracts vary depending not only on the parts of the fruit they come from, but also when fruits were harvested

  • Most tabletop sweeteners (aka tabletops) listed here have fillers or carriers to give them an overall taste & resemblance to table sugar

  • In powder tabletops: crystals color varies from white to light beige; crystals size is from medium (sugar-like) to coarse (demerara-like).  

 

Is monk fruit approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?

 

  • Monk fruit is not regulated as a food additive; instead has its use approved as a sweetener generally recognized as safe (GRAS)

  • Monk fruit extracts are sold with various mogroside content; extracts with 12.5% to 95% Mogroside V are the subject of GRAS notices

  • Looking for details on how extracts are made? Refer to each GRAS notice submitted by the manufacturer for FDA review

  • Monk fruit is promoted as a natural sweetener and approved by the FDA as a non-nutritive sweetener (0 cal/g).

There is A LOT to see here.

Scroll down to explore it all or, if you are short on time, make your choice below: 

Monk Fruit | Pure Extract
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | Liquid
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Erythritol
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Inulin
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Glucose
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Rare Sugars
Monk Fruit | with Stevia
Stevia is the term used to refer to steviol glycosides (highly refined extracts from the leaves of the stevia plant) 
Monk fruit is the term used to refer to mogrosides (extracts obtained from the luo han guo fruit)
Monk Fruit | Packets
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Click the Try it button of each sweetener to be linked to Amazon

where you can read reviews, labels, Q&As, and price

 
 

FILLERS or CARRIERS

  • Because monk fruit extracts provide intense sweet taste with tiny volume & weight, sweeteners need fillers (carriers) to fill in the empty space created by them so that they have an overall resemblance to table sugar. 

  • Fillers are carbohydrates. They add bulk (weight and volume) but only minimal carbohydrate and calories to each serving. No-calorie sweeteners meet FDA standards for no-calorie foods if they provide <5 calories per serving. 

  • The role of fillers in sweeteners involves: (1) make them spoonable and pourable; (2) improve the mouthfeel (that sensation of thicker or "fuller"), (3) improve taste by masking off-flavors (non-sweet taste) and (4) provide sweetness synergy (boost sweetness)

 

  • You should note that most tabletop sweeteners have just a hint of monk fruit extract. The weight ratio between the filler and monk fruit is in some cases 200 to 2000 (filler) to about 1 (monk fruit). It means that although almost 99% of the weight comes from the filler, 70 to 99% of the sweetness comes from monk fruit extract.

 

  • The most common fillers in monk fruit sweeteners is erythritol. Here are all fillers that you may find: sugars (glucose)rare sugars (allulose, tagatose)polyols (erythritol, glycerin)soluble fibers (inulin, isomaltooligosacharides) and polysaccharides (maltodextrin).

 

  • Non-sweet ingredients may be added for the following reasons: (1) to improve taste and maintain freshness, such as naturals flavors and preservatives (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate), (2) to reduce the level of stevia aftertaste (cream of tartar), (3) as anti-caking agents (calcium silicate) and (4) as binders (cellulose).

 
 
 
 
 
 

Monk Fruit Sweeteners

WITH GLUCOSE 

 
 
 
 

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Copyright © 2019   WhatSugar Blog | By Adriane Mulinari Campos 

Everywhere in the USA | Based in Richmond,VA | Email me at info@whatsugar.com

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