MONK FRUIT

On my quest to discover all zero-calorie monk fruit sweeteners available to you on store shelves, I found about 100 products

There is A LOT to see here.

Scroll down to explore it all or, if you are short on time, make your choice below: 

Monk Fruit | Pure Extract
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | Liquid
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Erythritol
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Inulin
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Glucose
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Rare Sugars
Monk Fruit + Stevia
Stevia is the term used to refer to steviol glycosides (highly refined extracts from the leaves of the stevia plant) 
Monk fruit is the term used to refer to mogrosides (extracts obtained from the luo han guo fruit)
Monk Fruit | Powdered & Golden
Monk Fruit | Packets
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FILLERS or BULKING AGENTS

  • Monk fruit extracts in pure form are super sweet.  A good rule of thumb is just 1/64 of a teaspoon of monk fruit extracts is as sweet as 1 teaspoon of sugar. Because they provide sweet taste with tiny volume and weight, sugar substitutes often need fillers or bulking agents to have an overall resemblance to table sugar...keep reading > 

  • The most common bulking agent in monk fruit sweeteners is erythritol. Others include glucose, maltodextrin, inulin, allulose, and tagatose. Bulking agents not only improve the taste of monk fruit extracts but also make it easier for you to measure sugar substitutes at home. Instead of having to measure or weigh minuscule amounts, you can use measuring tools you have in your kitchen. Note the following:

 

Monk Fruit Sweeteners

WITH ERYTHRITOL 

 
 
 
 
 

Monk Fruit Sweeteners

WITH GLUCOSE 

 
 
 
 
 
  • ​Sugar substitutes commonly known as Monk Fruit contain extracts from the fruit of the plant Siraitia grosvenorii SwingleChina is the only grower of the monk fruit plant, a perennial vine of the cucumber and melon family. The fruit has the size and shape of a lemon.

 

 

  • The color and flavor of the monk fruit crystals vary depending on the concentration of the mogroside V in the extract, which may be 30% or 50%. MogrosideV50 is whiter and has double the sweetness of mogrosideV30, which has a light beige color. The crystals size range from medium (sugar-like) to coarse (demerara-like). 

 

  • Sweeteners sold as "brown sugar replacement" are called golden or gold monk fruit and contain mogrosideV30 and a maple taste. Sweeteners sold as "powdered sugar replacement" contain finely ground erythritol or allulose combined with mogrosideV50. 

Is monk fruit approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?

 

  • Monk fruit is not regulated as a food additive; instead has its use approved as a sweetener generally recognized as safe (GRAS)

  • Monk fruit extracts are sold with various mogroside content; extracts with 12.5% to 95% Mogroside V are the subject of GRAS notices

  • Looking for details on how extracts are made? Refer to each GRAS notice submitted by the manufacturer for FDA review

  • Monk fruit is promoted as a natural sweetener and approved by the FDA as a non-nutritive sweetener (0 cal/g).

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Copyright © 2020  WhatSugar Blog by Adriane Campos 

Everywhere in the USA | Based in Richmond,VA | Email me at info@whatsugar.com

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