REDUCED CALORIE SWEETENERS

On my quest to discover all sweeteners with 25 to 90% fewer calories than table sugar, I found hundreds of options and list them here.

Reduced Calorie Refined Sugar
White Sugar Blend contains white cane sugar blended with a reduced calorie sweetener and/or a high intensity sweetener.

Brown Sugar Blend contains regular brown sugar instead.

It helps consumers reduce regular sugar intake. It is designed for baking and cooking as it gives the benefits of sugar (familiar taste, rising, browning, moisture) with less calories per serving.

1/2 cup of white or brown sugar blends sweetener is typically equal 1 cup of regular white or brown sugar
Reduced Calorie Sugars
Raw Cane Sugar Blend: is a raw cane sugar blended with one or more reduced calorie sweetener and/or high intensity sweetener.
Also called baker's blend or baking blend,
it maintains almost the same role of raw cane sugars in baking, but with less calories. Is typically twice as sweet as regular refined sugar.
Reduced Calorie Syrups
Liquid Blends (syrups) are often 2x as sweet as the pure caloric sweetener.
These blends contain honey or agave blended with stevia. It maintains some of honey or agave's role, but with less calories.

Pancake syrup, waffle syrup or simply 'syrup' may be (1) LITE, LIGHT; (2) LOW CALORIE caloric sweeteners (sugar, cane syrup, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, etc) are blended with high-intensity sweeteners (sucralose, stevia, etc)
Replace Sugar 1:1 | w/ Maltodextrin
Are tabletop sweeteners that measure cup-for-cup like regular sugar,
and mantain some of sugar's role in baking
but with less calories.

When substituting this sweetener for sugar, consumer must substitute 'equal volume', not 'equal weight', because this sweetener is much lighter than sugar.

Do not contain a sugar but have as main ingredient carbohydrates such as polysaccharides (often maltodextrin) that breaks down into glucose.
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Erythritol
Erythritol-based Sweeteners. Erythritol is a polyol or sugar alcohol - a type of carbohydrate that, unlike sugar, is not completely digested. It is less sweet than sugar (~70% the sweetness of regular sugar). It is promoted as a natural sweetener as is found in nature but is synthetically produced by fermentation or an electrochemical process. It is considered a zero-calorie sweetener as it provides 0.2 kcal/g.
Xylitol
Xylitol is a polyol or sugar alcohol - a type of carbohydrate that, unlike sugar, is digested slowly, having little impact on blood sugar or insulin levels. Xylitol provides about half the calories of regular sugar (sucrose). Xylitol is the sweetest of the polyols and is as sweet as sucrose.
Xylitol Blends
Xylitol-based Sweeteners. These sweeteners contain xylitol blended with stevia, inulin, erythritol, or sucralose.
Xylitol is a polyol or sugar alcohol - a type of carbohydrate that, unlike sugar, is digested slowly, having little impact on blood sugar or insulin levels. Xylitol provides about half the calories of regular sugar (sucrose). Xylitol is the sweetest of the polyols and is as sweet as sucrose.
Sorbitol | Mannitol | Isomalt
Sorbitol and mannitol were the first polyols to become available as sweeteners; suited for sugar free recipes, they attracted diabetics. Sorbitol, mannitol and isomalt are about half as sweet as table sugar. Sorbitol provides 2.6 cal per gram, Isomalt 2 cal per gram, and mannitol 1.6 cal per gram.
Replace Sugar 1:1
Sweeteners that measure cup-for-cup like regular sugar,
and mantain some of sugar's role in baking
but with less calories.

When substituting this sweetener for sugar, consumer must substitute 'equal volume', not 'equal weight', because this sweetener is much lighter than sugar.

Erythritol, the main ingredient, is blend with a high intensity sweetener such as stevia, monk fruit, or sucralose.
Allulose
Yacon Powder & Syrup
Soluble Fibers | Inulin, FOS, IMO
Sweeteners with soluble fibers | Fructooligosacharides (FOS): a carbohydrate with linear chains of (< 9) fructoses.
Inulin (from Jerusalem artichoke, chicory root, or agave): a carbohydrate with long chains of ( > 10) fructoses.
Isomalto-oligosaccharide (IMO): a short-chain carbohydrate, produced from starch.
FOS, inulin & IMO have 1/2 the calories of table sugar and are prebiotics (are minimally digested in the small intestine and stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria)
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  • Tabletop sweeteners reduced in calories provide 25 to 90 percent fewer calories than table sugar

  • As opposed to high intensity sweeteners, all reduced calorie sweeteners have bulking properties, their big advantage

  • They have bulking properties which means they add weight & volume to foods, impacting mouthfeel & texture, like table sugar does

  • Two groups of reduced calorie sweeteners are listed here: (1) Blends with Less Sugar; (2) Low-Digestible Sweeteners

  • Compared to table sugar, Blends with Less Sugar are often 2x sweeter and Low-Digestible Sweeteners are less sweet

  • These sweeteners are often promoted for baking, even though some do not undergo caramelization and other browning reactions

  • The Cup-for-Cup sweeteners are as sweet as table sugar and so, are conveniently measured like sugar on a 1 to 1 ratio

  • May be blended with high intensity sweeteners (stevia, monk fruit, sucralose) but, unlike the zero-calorie products, they provide calories

  • Be aware that they are not zero-calorie, but by law may be labeled as "no calorie sweetener" if providing less than 5 cal per serving

  • A serving is often the amount of sweetener (drop, squeeze, packet) with sweetness equivalent to 1 or 2 teaspoons of sugar, not 1 cup. 

  1. Are also known a'Reduced Sugar' Blend, 'Less Sugar' Blend, or Baking Blend; as the name implies, they are not sugar-free

  2. Are blends of sweeteners: a sugar or syrup (caloric sweetener) as the predominant ingredient, plus a low-digestible sweetener and/or a high intensity sweetener

  3. The predominant sweeteners in these blends are: white sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, coconut sugar, honey, maple syrup, agave, or corn syrups

  4. Are typically twice as sweet as table sugar or the caloric sweetener it replaces, i.e., half teaspoon (tsp) of these blends is equal to one tsp of table sugar (or the syrup it replaces)

  5. These blends maintain (almost) the same role of the sugar or syrup it replaces, but with 25 to 75% fewer calories

Note: Maltodextrin-based sweeteners that measure like sugar on a 1:1 ratio are included with the "reduced calorie" sweeteners. Maltodextrin is not a sugar but is broken down into sugars (maltose & glucose) in our mouth, stomach, and small intestine, being absorbed as pure glucose.

 

  1. Tabletop sweeteners that contain low-digestible carbohydrates, such as polyols, rare sugars, and some soluble fibers

  2. These carbohydrates are incompletely or not absorbed at all in the small intestine; they pass into the large intestine where they are fermented by the microbiota

  3. Being digestive resistant or partially digested, they provide 25 to 90% fewer calories than table sugar

  4. Most of these carbohydrates are less sweet than table sugar and often blended with high intensity sweeteners such as stevia, monk fruit, and sucralose

  5. Are promoted as prebiotics (stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut), low "net carbs", and low glycemic index sweeteners (even though some are not sugar-free)

Note: I list erythritol and stevia blends that are suggested to be measured as a cup-for-cup substitute for table sugar with Reduced Calorie Sweeteners, even though their label states 'no calorie sweetener'. Learn why here.

Ingredient Composition

Sugar substitutes are availbale to you in a wide range of ingredient composition. They may contain only one ingredient or have a long list. I show you here the combinations of ingredients in reduced calorie sweeteners I have found. 

To simplify, I do not list the non-sweet ingredients added to improve taste and maintain freshness, such as naturals flavors and preservatives (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate), and those to reduce the level of HIS aftertaste (cream of tartar), nor anti-caking agents (calcium silicate) and binders (cellulose). 

List of Reduced Calories Sweeteners

Carriers shown in parenthesis

  • Blends with less sugar or Cup-For-Cup Sugar Substitute or Baking blend

  1. White sugar blend (+ sucralose or stevia or oligosaccharides)

  2. Brown sugar blend (+ sucralose or stevia)

  3. Raw sugar blend (+ stevia)

  4. Coconut sugar blend (+ stevia)

  5. Fructose blend (+ stevia)

  6. Cane syrup blend (+ stevia)

  7. Agave blend (+ stevia and/or monk fruit or oligosaccharides)

  8. Honey blend (+ stevia or oligosaccharides)

  9. Maple syrup blend (+ oligosaccharides)

  10. Lite table syrup = (sugar, cane syrup, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup) + (sucralose, stevia) + (polyols)

 

  1. Maltodextrin blend (+ stevia or monk fruit or aspartame/acesulfame K or sucralose)

  2. Erythritol blend (+ stevia or monk fruit or rare sugars or oligosaccharides)

  • Polyols or sugar alcohols

  1. Erythritol

  2. Xylitol

  3. Xylitol (+stevia)

 

  • Soluble fibers

  1. Inulin | from Jerusalem artichoke, chicory root, or agave

  2. Inulin blend (+ stevia or FOS or polyol)

  3. Fructooligosaccharides = FOS (+ erythritol + inulin)

  4. Yacon syrup

  5. Yacon powder

  6. Isomalto-oligosaccharide = IMO (+ stevia or  monk fruit + tagatose)

 

  • Rare Sugars 

  1. Allulose

  2. Kabocha pumpkin extract

  3. Tagatose

  4. Xylose

Copyright © 2020   WhatSugar Blog | By Adriane Mulinari Campos 

Everywhere in the USA | Based in Richmond,VA | Email me at info@whatsugar.com

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