ALLULOSE

On my quest to discover all sweeteners with allulose (the so-called "real sugar without the calories" and

"the sugar-free sugar"), I found 24 products

aka D-psicose

Click the Try it button of each sweetener to be linked to Amazon

where you can read reviews, labels, Q&As, and price.

Affiliate links help keep this content free (Full disclosure)

  • Allulose is a mildly sweet sugar found in nature (raisins, figs, maple syrup) in tiny amounts but, to be produced in a cost-effective industrial scale, it is synthetically made from cornstarch. 

  • It provides the functional benefits of regular sugars such as bulking properties (body and weight) and browning reaction. It has almost identical taste and texture of table sugar, but with the advantage of providing fewer calories.

  • Allulose has the same chemical formula as fructose and glucose but its atoms are arranged slightly differently, which makes it behave very differently in our body. It is completely absorbed in the small intestine but not significantly metabolized, as a result, it provides 5 to 10% of the calories of table sugar; no more than 0.4 calories per gram or 1.5 cal/teaspoon or 70 cal/ cup.

  • Most of the allulose you ingest is excreted in urine and it does not impact blood glucose or insulin levels. Since 2019, Allulose may be excluded from the sugar count on nutrition facts labels and may carry the "no added sugar" claim.

  • You can typically use about the same amount as table sugar to achieve desired results in your recipes, but they will not be as sweet. It is 30% less sweet than table sugar, and to compensate for that, it may be blended with high intensity sweeteners.

  • Advantages: sweet taste, lower in calories, bulking properties. Disadvantage: Excess consumption may cause diarrhea or other adverse gastrointestinal effects. Read more about it on the Low-Digestible Sweeteners page.

WhatSugar  Blog is reader-supported.

 

When you buy through Amazon links, this blog may earn an affiliate commission.

A one-woman business relying on Amazon affiliate commission to avoid ads.

Copyright © 2020  WhatSugar Blog by Adriane Mulinari Campos 

Everywhere in the USA | Based in Richmond,VA | Email me at info@whatsugar.com

  • WhatSugar YouTube Channel
  • WhatSugar Blog Facebook
  • Twitter what_sugar
  • WhatSugar Blog Pinterest
  • WhatSugar Blog Instagram
  • LinkedIn