ZERO CALORIE SWEETENERS

On my quest to discover all zero-calorie sweeteners in stores across the United States,

I found hundreds of options and list them here in two groups: natural & artificial

 

NATURAL SWEETENERS

Stevia | Brown & Powdered
Stevia Sweeteners | Brown Sugar Replacements and Powdered Sugar Replacements
Stevia | Dried Leaf
The whole-leaf Stevia is dried, cut, and turn into a green powder. It has a very mild sweet taste and does not dissolve well. Extracts (highly refined with > or = 95% purity) from the leaf are approved by the FDA but the leaves itself are not due to inadequate toxicological information.
Stevia | with Benefits
Stevia extracts offer no health benefits because the amount we eat is minuscule, but the sweeteners I list here contain ingredients that do provide health benefits – such as vitamins and fibers
Monk Fruit | Pure Extract
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | Liquid
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Erythritol
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Inulin
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Glucose
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Monk Fruit | with Rare Sugars
Monk fruit, also called luo han guo fruit, is a small green fruit of the Chinese plant Siraitia grosvenorii Swingle. The sweet components in the fruit, referred to as mogrosides, are 230 to 425 times sweeter than table sugar.
Show More
Monk Fruit | Powdered & Golden
Powdered and Brown Sugar Substitutes made with Monk Fruit Extract
Monk Fruit & Stevia Blend
Monk fruit extract blended with stevia leaf extract sweeteners
Monk Fruit | Packets
Does monk fruit come in packets, sticks, and cubes?
Erythritol
Erythritol granulated versus powdered versus blends
Allulose
Does allulose cause diarrhrea? Does allulose kick you out of ketosis?
Miracle Fruit | Dried and Tablets
Miracle Fruit extract (or Miraculin) is a protein extracted from the African berry, Synsepalum dulcificum (or Richardella dulcifica). It does not taste sweet but is able to transform acidic flavors into sweet. It can enhance the sweetness of low pH (acid) foods and beverages to become 200 to 800 times sweeter than table sugar.
Show More
Stevia | Pure Extract
Stevia leaf extracts are food ingredients with GRAS status. The leaf extracts go through a great deal of processing and purification until they become palatable and free of impurities. They provides zero calories and are 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar. Find here a variety of brands of pure stevia leaf extracts.
Stevia | Liquid
Stevia leaf extracts are food ingredients with GRAS status. The leaf extracts go through a great deal of processing and purification until they become palatable and free of impurities. They provides zero calories and are 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar. Find here brands of liquid stevia. The most common carriers include glycerine, erythitol, alcohol, and cellulose. Some are sold as dietary supplements and allow health claims on labels.
Stevia | with Erythritol
Stevia leaf extracts are food ingredients with GRAS status. The leaf extracts go through a great deal of processing and purification until they become palatable and free of impurities. They provides zero calories and are 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar. Find here a variety of brands of stevia-erythritol blend.
Stevia | with Inulin
Stevia leaf extracts are food ingredients with GRAS status. The leaf extracts go through a great deal of processing and purification until they become palatable and free of impurities. They provides zero calories and are 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar. Find here a variety of brands of stevia-inulin blend.
Stevia | with Sugars
Stevia leaf extracts are food ingredients with GRAS status. The leaf extracts go through a great deal of processing and purification until they become palatable and free of impurities. They provides zero calories and are 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar. Find here brands of stevia-sugar blends. Sugars used are glucose or organic raw cane sugar.
Stevia | with Maltodextrin
Stevia leaf extracts are food ingredients with GRAS status. The leaf extracts go through a great deal of processing and purification until they become palatable and free of impurities. They provides zero calories and are 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar. Find here brands of stevia-maltodextrin blends.
Stevia | with Xylitol
Stevia blended with Xylitol Sweeteners | Brands and Products
Stevia | with Rare Sugars
Stevia blended with Allulose and Tagatose | Brands and Products
Stevia | Monk Fruit Blend
Stevia is the term used to refer to steviol glycosides (highly refined extracts from the leaves of the stevia plant) 
Monk fruit is the term used to refer to mogrosides (extracts obtained from the luo han guo fruit)
Show More
  • Sugar substitutes labeled as "natural" and "zero-calories" contain sweeteners obtained from a plant. Stevia, monk fruit, erythritol, and allulose are FDA-approved. 

  • Natural high-intensity sweeteners labeled as "zero calories" are much sweeter than table sugar and include stevia (the term used to refer to steviol glycosides = refined extracts from the leaves of the stevia plant) and monk fruit (the term used to refer to mogrosides = refined extracts from the monk fruit)

 

  • Natural carbohydrates labeled as "zero calories" are less sweet than table sugar and include erythritol (sugar alcohol obtained from corn) and allulose (rare sugar obtained from corn).

  • Miracle fruit extract (contains miraculin) is not an FDA-approved ingredient so you are not going to find it as a sugar substitute. However, you can buy the fruit itself or the extract in tablet form. 

  • Find out if a sweetener claimed as "natural" meets your expectations by reading two of my blog posts: 

 
 

ARTIFICAL SWEETENERS

Sucralose
The food additive Sucralose is made from table sugar in a process that changes its configuration into a compound around 600 times sweeter with no calories.
Saccharin
The food additive Saccharin is a salt around 200 to 700 times sweeter than table sugar. It provides no calories as it is not metabolized and is excreted in urine. It has noe effect on bood glucose. It may be combined with other sweeteners (such as glucose) or bulking agents (such as maltodextrin) in commercial tabletop sweeteners.
Aspartame
The food additive Aspartame is a high intensity sweetener that, being a protein, provides 4 Calories/g. But since it can be up to 400 times sweeter than table sugar, it is used in such small amounts that contributes few to no calories. It is approved by the FDA as a nutritive sweetener.
Show More
  • Artificial sweeteners are not found in nature. Even if produced from a source material found in nature (such as sucralose, which is made from table sugar) or their component parts are found in nature (such as aspartame, which is split in our body into 3 components widely found in foods), it does not make them a natural sweetener.

  • Six artificial sweeteners are approved as ingredients in sugar substitutes (find them listed below). Saccharin-based products were the first available in stores; the Sweet'N Low brand name has been the most popularAspartame–acesulfame K blends were popular for some time but were surpassed by sucralose, which is the most used of all six.

  • Only a couple of brands use neotame as an ingredient and I have not found sweeteners containing advantame, the most recently approved high-intensity sweetener.

WHAT'S A ZERO CALORIE SWEETENER?

  • Zero Calorie Sweeteners are available to you in various forms: granulated, powdered, sachets, cubes, tablets, liquid, and syrup. The color code for them is usually green for stevia, yellow for sucralose, blue for aspartame, and pink for saccharin.

  • By law, a sweetener may be labeled calorie-free, no-calorie, or zero-calorie if it provides less than 5 cal per serving. One serving is often the amount of product (teaspoon, drops, squeezes) with sweetness equivalent to 1 or 2 teaspoons of table sugar.

THE HIGH-INTENSITY SWEETENERS

  • Most zero-calories sugar substitutes you find in stores have High-Intensity Sweeteners (HIS), which deliver intense sweetness with no calories and no nutritional benefits. Being several hundred times sweeter than table sugar, they are used in a fraction of the weight of any caloric sweetener

  • Because they are used in such small amounts, they have no effect on volume, nor mouthfeel. As a result, high-intensity sweeteners are often blended with fillers or bulking agents which give them an overall resemblance to table sugar, making them spoonable & pourable, and mask their off-flavors.

  • As opposed to table sugar, they are used mainly for sweetening purposes and no other culinary role. Most zero-calorie sugar substitutes containing high-intensity sweeteners tend to work best in foods that do not require sugars for texture, shelf life, moisture retention, color, and aroma.

  • More recently, two sweeteners - erythritol and allulose - have been promoted as zero calories. They are not high-intensity sweeteners. In fact, both are less sweet than table sugar. In addition, they are not completely free of calories as high-intensity sweeteners are. They provide about 1 to 1.5 calories per teaspoon or 40 to 70 calories per cup, which makes them "reduced-calorie sweeteners". Learn more about erythritol here and about allulose here.

Which high-intensity sweeteners are FDA-approved?

  • Aspartame is the only one approved as a nutritive sweetener because it provides 4 cal per gram, but it is used in such small amounts that it is effectively non-nutritive. Stevia, monk fruit, sucralose, saccharin, acesulfame K and neotame are non-nutritive sweeteners (0 cal/ gram).

  • Stevia (leaf extract) is the most popular high-intensity sweetener. I found almost 200 products sold in stores and list them here. They contain a variety of stevia leaf extracts such as reb A, reb D, reb M, or stevioside.  

 

  • Miracle fruit extract (miraculin) is not approved as an ingredient in sweeteners. Erythritol and allulose are not high-intensity sweeteners; you can read more about erythritol here and about allulose here.

 

Copyright © 2020  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  WhatSugar Blog

Everywhere in the USA  |  Based in Richmond, VA |  Email me at info@whatsugar.com

  • WhatSugar YouTube Channel
  • WhatSugar Blog Facebook
  • Twitter what_sugar
  • WhatSugar Blog Pinterest
  • WhatSugar Blog Instagram
  • LinkedIn