MEET THE SUGARS

What is sugar, anyway?

  • The sugar we most often refer to is the one in our sugar bowl, sucrose from cane or beet. However, chemically speaking, the word sugar means a simple carbohydrate from any source and will be used here to indicate caloric sweeteners.

  • It encompasses a wide array of caloric sweeteners from many different sources, not only from cane and beet. Honey is a sugar. Maple syrup is a sugar. It is available in a variety of forms such as granulated, cubes, tablets, liquid and syrup.

  • The sweeteners I call "sugars" are referred to as "added sugars" by the Food and Drug AdministrationAmerican Heart Association, and in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020. The World Health Organization calls them "free sugars".

  • This definition excludes intrinsic and intact sugars - also known as "naturally occurring" - found in whole foods like milk and fruits. Be aware that "naturally occurring" is not the same as "natural". The fructose sold in the store is a natural sugar; it is a synthetic sweetener made from corn or table sugar. The fructose in an apple is a naturally occurring sugar. Read two of my blog posts to learn exactly what a natural sweetener means:  

Chemically Speaking

Sugars are the smallest and simplest type of carbohydrates. They are easily digested and absorbed by the body. There are two types of sugar.

Simple sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose) are small enough to be absorbed directly into the bloodstream.

Double Sugars (sucrose, maltose, lactose), as the name implies, contain 2 simple sugars linked together; are broken down in the body into simple sugars.

Caloric Sweeteners are made up of simple and/or double sugars in concentrated form.

Cane Sugars

Sucrose-based sweeteners.

 

Cane Sugar is sold in unrefined, raw & refined forms.

 

More than forty different types of cane sugar are available to consumers on store shelves nationwide. 

 

Scroll down to explore them.

Beet Sugar, Refined Sugar, Table Sugar, White Sugar, Brown Sugar, Confectioners Sugar

Sucrose-based sweeteners.

 

Contrary to cane sugar, which is available in unrefined, raw and refined forms, 

beet sugar is sold as refined sugar only.

55% of the total refined sugar consumed each year in the U.S. is from beet.

 

Some distributors blend beet-sugar with cane-sugar. It is almost impossible to distinguish cane from beet sugar, as both contain over 99.9% sucrose. 

Sugar is Sugar is Sugar

Contain sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, and/or galactose.

 

Include caloric sweeteners (sugars) from tree saps, flower nectar, fruits, and cereal/starch.

 

The most common: honey & maple syrup.

 

Agave nectar, sorghum syrup, date sugar & syrup, fruit juice concentrate, fruit powder, barley malt syrup & powder, brown rice syrup, cassava syrup, crystalline fructose, glucose, and lactose 

 

 
White Sugars
'White sugars' are refined sugars made from cane or beet. They are produced in several crystal sizes, such as granulated sugar, fine granulated, extra fine granulated, superfine sugar, ultrafine sugar, powdered sugar, fondant sugar, sanding sugar, sparkling sugar. They contain over 99.95 percent sucrose.
Granulated Sugar
Granulated sugar is a refined sugar with 99.95 percent sucrose (water being the main remainder). Also known as table sugar or simply 'sugar'. What most sugar manufacturers call granulated sugar is the white sugar with crystal size ranging from 0.3 to 0.55mm.
Superfine Sugar
Superfine sugar is a refined sugar with crystal sizes from about 0.2 to 0.3mm. Also known as quick dissolve sugar. Contains 99.95 percent sucrose.
Ultrafine Sugar
Ultrafine sugar is a refined sugar that typically has crystal sizes from 0.1 to 0.2mm. Contains 99.95 percent sucrose. Also called baker's special sugar, baker's sugar, or caster sugar.
Powdered Sugar
Powdered sugar typically has crystal sizes smaller than 0.1mm. Is also known as confectioners sugar. Due to its fineness nature, starch is added to powdered sugar to absorb moisture and let it free flowing. They contain 97 percent sucrose and 3 percent starch. Powdered sugars are produced in various crystal sizes determined by a 'X' factor. The higher the number prior to 'X', the finer it is.
Fondant Sugar
Also known as icing sugar or frosting sugar. May be a cane or beet sugar. Due to its fineness nature, starch is added to absorb moisture and let it free flowing. They contain 97 percent sucrose and 3 percent starch.
Sanding Sugar
Coarse sugars have larger crystals than granulated sugar. Coarse sugars are the purest of all refined sugars. Over 99.96 percent sucrose!
Sparkling Sugar
Coarse sugars have larger crystals than granulated sugar. Coarse sugars are the purest of all refined sugars. Over 99.96 percent sucrose!
Rock Sugar
Rock sugar, rock candy, sugar crystals and sugar swizzle sticks are made at home or commercially from a hot saturated solution of granulated sugar. As the solution cools down, big sugar crystals form.
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Light Brown Sugar
Brown sugar is a refined sugar. Three types of brown sugar may be produced in a sugar refinery: light or golden brown, dark brown and free-flowing brown sugar.
Light and dark brown sugars may be brown on the outside only or all the way though.
Dark Brown Sugar
Brown sugar is a refined sugar. Three types of brown sugar may be produced in a sugar refinery: light or golden brown, dark brown and free-flowing brown sugar.
Light and dark brown sugars may be brown on the outside only or all the way though.
Pourable Brown Sugar
Brown sugar is a refined sugar. Three types of brown sugar may be produced in a sugar refinery: light or golden brown, dark brown and free-flowing brown sugar.
Light and dark brown sugars may be brown on the outside only or all the way though.
Sugar Cubes & Tablets
Sugar cubes & tablets is granulated sugar that is moist with water and then compressed or molded into a particular shape.
Simple Syrup
Simple syrup is simply a solution of sucrose in water. Simple syrups often contain about 50% sugar (sucrose) and 50% water; or 1 part of sugar for 1 part of water by weight.

Commercial simple syrups may have additional ingredients that act as a preservative and help prevent crystallization (in cases where the syrup is more concentrated)
Invert Syrup
Invert cane syrup is a syrup containing mainly cane sugar and 'invert sugar' in water.

To produce 'Invert sugar', an acid or the enzyme invertase is added to a syrup made with refined cane or beet sugar and water. The sucrose molecule (from the refined sugar) then breaks down into its component parts, glucose and fructose. The resulting syrup is called 'full invert' if about 90% of the sucrose is broken down or 'medium invert' if about 50% of the sucrose splits.
Mild Molasses
Mild molasses comes from the first boiling toward the production of sugar crystals. They are mildly bitter and sweet. They are also referred to as first-boil, light, golden, barbados or robust molasses.
Dark Molasses
Dark Molasses is a by-product syrup remaining after the crystallization of Sucrose from cane in Sugar Mills. It is referred to as 'second molasses' because it comes from the second boiling toward the production of sugar crystals. It is also known as medium or full (flavored) molasses. It is darker in color, has more pronounced flavor, slightly more bitter taste and is slightly less sweet than the first molasses.
Blackstrap Molasses
Blackstrap Molasses is a by-product of the refining process of cane sugar. It is the syrup left when no more sucrose can be crystallized. Also known as third or final molasses as it comes from the third and last boiling carried out in a Sugar Mill or a Sugar Refinery. Blackstrap molasses
is the least sweet, the most bitter, and the darkest of all the cane molasses.
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Beet Sugar
The most common beet sugars found on the market are (fine or extra fine) granulated sugar, (light or dark) brown sugar and confectioners sugar
Non-GMO Beet Sugar
Non-GMO beet sugars & syrups are usually imported from Europe where genetically modified sugar beets are not grown. In the U.S., bioengineered sugar beets are grown and sent to sugar factories to be processed into refined sugar.
Beet Syrup
An invert syrup made from beet sugar. Non-gmo, since it is produced in Europe.
Cane & Beet Sugar Blended
Some sugar marketers, such as United Sugars Corporation and Cargill, may combine cane and beet sugar. Some granulated, brown and confectioners sugars available on the market might be cane sugar mixed with beet sugar. Most store brands are a blend of both, unless the label states it is 'cane sugar'. By law, the use of the term 'sugar' in food labels is for cane or beet sugar only. Sugar manufacturers and distributors are not required to mention the source - if from beet or cane.
Decorative Sugars
Decorative sugars, such as pearl sugars, are made by crushing blocks of white refined sugar or by pushing sugar through an extrusion die. Shaped like irregular little balls, these sugars are typically used to decorate the tops of baked goods as they do not melt during the baking process.
Blends of Sugars
Some commercial sugars are combinations of refined sugar (sucrose from cane or beet) and sugars from other sources such glucose, lactose and coconut sugar.
 
Raw Cane Sugar
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Raw Sugar | Coarse Brown Crystals
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Demerara | Coarse Blonde Crystals
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Turbinado Sugar
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Turbinado Sugar | Coarse
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Evaporated Cane Juice
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Dried Cane Syrup
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Dehydrated Cane Juice
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Washed Sugar
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
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Natural Cane Sugar
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Natural Cane Sugar | Coarse
Raw cane sugar is any type of cane sugar refined through one cycle of crystallization and centrifugation, retaining trace amounts of the original cane molasses. They generally contain less than 2% molasses and 97 to 99% sucrose.
They are also known and labeled as:
Evaporated cane sugar,
Raw sugar,
Washed sugar,
Turbinado sugar,
Demerara sugar,
Natural cane sugar,
Dried cane syrup,
Dehydrated cane juice, &
Less processed cane sugar.
Demerara Sugar Cubes
Cubes & Tablets from Raw Cane Sugar. Are obtained from raw sugar that is moist with water and then compressed or molded into a particular shape such as Cubes & Tablets. Contain over 95% sucrose. Commonly used to sweeten hot drinks.
Organic Sugar
Organic sugar is a raw cane sugar with medium size crystals made from organic sugarcane and processed according USDA's Organic Standards. They retain trace amounts of the original cane molasses, consequently having blond color and a delicate molasses flavor. They contain 99.5% sucrose.
Organic Sugar | Coarse
Organic cane sugars are raw sugars made from organic sugarcane and processed according USDA's Organic Standards. Are slightly less refined than table sugar but are much less processed. Retain small amounts of the original cane molasses (typically < 2%) consequently having blond color and a hint of molasses flavor. TYoically contain 97 to 99.5% sucrose.
Organic Light Brown Sugar
Organic brown sugars are produced by adding organic cane molasses to organic sugar.
Organic Dark Brown Sugar
Organic brown sugars are produced by adding organic cane molasses to organic sugar.
Organic Powdered Sugar
Organic powdered sugar is made by grinding organic sugar and then blending it with an organic anti-caking agent such as organic tapioca or corn starch. Retains a bit of the cane’s natural molasses flavor.
Organic Rock Sugar
Organic rock sugar is made from organic sugarcane and processed according USDA's Organic Standards.
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Cane Syrup from Raw Sugar
Invert syrup may be produced from raw sugar. It is mainly raw cane sugar blended with 'invert sugar' and water. To produce 'Invert sugar', an acid or the enzyme invertase is added to a syrup made with raw cane sugar and water. The sucrose molecule (from the raw sugar) then breaks down into its component parts, glucose and fructose. The resulting syrup is called 'full invert' if about 90% of the sucrose is broken down or 'medium invert' if about 50% of the sucrose splits.
Organic Cane Molasses
Organic blackstrap molasses is a by-product of the refining process of organic raw cane sugars. It is produced in a Sugar Mill, which is always located close to cane plantations. Organic blackstrap molasses is slightly sweeter and less bitter than regular blackstrap molasses (produced in a Sugar Refinery). It is made from organic sugarcane and is processed according USDA's Organic Standards.
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Whole Cane Sugar
Whole cane sugar refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
As cane juice is concentrated, a sticky dark syrup, called cane molasses, surrounds the pure sugar (sucrose) crystals. The color of the resulting brown sugars depends on the amount of the molasses they retain.
Unrefined Cane Sugar
Three types of cane sugar are produced: unrefined, raw and refined sugar. The least refined are the so-called 'unrefined', such as muscovado and Sucanat.
Sucanat
Sucanat, which stands for Sugar Cane Natural, is not a traditional brown sugar, but it is an unrefined cane sugar produced by a drying process developed by the Swiss company Pronatec.
Sucanat is a registered trademark of Wholesome Sweeteners Inc, from Sugar Land, TX.
Dark Muscovado
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Light Muscovado
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Jaggery
Sugars manufacturers & suppliers call 'unrefined cane sugar', any type of cane sugar that retains most of the original cane molasses around the sucrose crystals.
But be aware: All cane sugars available to consumers are refined and processed. The so-called 'Unrefined cane sugars' go through a great deal of processing and are refined, but less than white sugars.
Panela
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Panela | Ground
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Piloncillo
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
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Okinawa Kokuto
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Rapadura
Traditional artisan brown sugars are produced in small batches for local markets with simple equipment and little capital using hundreds of years old know-how.
Put simply, their refining process involves collecting the cane juice, clarifying it and boiling its water off through slow simmering in open kettles.
Traditional Cane Syrup
Traditional cane syrups & molasses are produced close to cane fields by slow simmering clarified cane juice in open kettles. They are not a by-product of the cane sugar refining process as they do not have sugar crystals removed from them.
Traditional Cane Molasses
Traditional cane syrups & molasses are produced close to cane fields by slow simmering clarified cane juice in open kettles. They are not a by-product of the cane sugar refining process as they do not have sugar crystals removed from them.
The Real Unrefined Cane Sugar
The only real unrefined cane sugar you can have is if you chew the fresh peeled fibrous stalk of cane which is filled with sap.
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Agave Nectar
Agave nectar (or syrup) is a sweetener made from various species of agave, most famously blue agave - a succulent plant mainly from Mexico that is also a source of tequila. It is made by extracting the sap from the hearth of the plant. The sap is processed into a blend of fructose (55-90%) and glucose. It is 30-40% sweeter than table sugar. Sweetness = 1.3 - 1.4. Provides 20 Cal/ teaspoon; 60 Cal/ tablespoon
Coconut Sugar & Nectar
Coconut nectar is made by extracting dilute juice from the tropical palm tree, and then boiling off most or all the water - the coconut sugar. The major component of coconut sugar is sucrose (70-79%) followed by glucose and fructose (3-9% each). It is claimed to be the most sustainable sweetener in the world. Same sweetness as table sugar. Sweetness = 1. Provides 4 Cal/g or 16 Cal/tsp.
Sorghum Syrup
Sorghum syrup (or sorghum molasses) is made from the juice extracted from sweet sorghum cane, a cold tolerant cousin of sugarcane. The juice is traditionally concentrated in open pans in artisanal way. It is about 70% as sweet as table sugar; Sweetness = 0.7. Provides ~ 70 Cal per tablespoon; 20 Cal per teaspoon
Date Sugar & Syrup
Date sugar is made by drying dates and looks like light brown sugar. According to some commercial brands, it is an one-to-one replacement for white sugar or brown sugar but date sugar does not dissolve quite as well. It is less sweet than table sugar. Provides 10-15 Cal per teaspoon.
Fruit Juice Concentrate
Fruit Juice Concentrates (FJC) are made by evaporating most of the water of a fruit juice, usually from grapes, apples or pears. Contain different proportions of fructose, glucose and sucrose depending on the fruit used. Provide 40-60 Calories pe tablespoon. A typical FJC is sweeter than table sugar.
Lucuma Powder
Lucuma powder is made from the dried, ground fruit of the lucuma tree. Lucuma is an exotic mildly sweet subtropical fruit found in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. Lucuma Powder is much less sweet than table sugar. A commercial lucuma powder available on the market provides 60 Calories per tablespoon and contains 5 g of fiber.
Brown Rice Syrup
Rice Syrup is made by breaking down the starch in brown rice into sugars maltose & glucose, plus a carbohydrate a little bit larger than sugars called maltotriose. Maltose is two glucoses linked together; maltotriose is 3 glucoses. As it it digested as pure glucose, is promoted to consumers willing to limit fructose. It is 70% as sweet than table sugar. Sweetness = 0.7. Provides 25 Cal per teaspoon; 75 Cal/ tablespoon
Barley Malt Syrup
Malt or malted barley syrup is made from barley that has been sprouted, converting the starch in the cereal grain into the sugars maltose & glucose, plus another carbohydrate, maltotriose. Maltose is two glucoses linked together; maltotriose is 3 glucoses. As it it digested as pure glucose, is promoted to consumers willing to limit fructose. Has been around for thousands of years. Is about half as sweet as table sugar. Sweetness = 0.5. Provides about 20 Calories per/teaspoon; 60 Cal /tablespoon
Tapioca or Cassava Syrup
Tapioca or Cassava Syrup is made from the starch of the cassava tuber or yucca root (also known as manioc). Since there isn't cultivation of a genetically modified tapioca, the syrup is advertised as a non-gmo sweetener. Contain glucose and maltose. It is less sweet than table sugar. Sweetness = 0.5-0.7. Provides about 20-25 Calories per/teaspoon; 60-75Cal /tablespoon
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Lactose
Lactose is the only sugar found in milk. It is composed of glucose and galactose joined together. It is what gives the milk its sweet taste. As newborns we have a lot of it. Lactose provides half of the calories in mother's milk. It is much less sweet and soluble than sucrose. Is 20% as sweet as table sugar. Sweetness ~ 0.2. Has 4 Cal/g or 16 Cal/tsp
Fructose
Fructose in pure crystalline form is one of the sweetest of all sugars. Produced from starch or refined sugar (sucrose). It absorbs and retain water effectively. Contains over 98% fructose, less than 0.5% glucose, and about 0.5% water. It is about 20% sweeter than table sugar, but in cold drinks may be up to 70%. Sweetness = 1.2 - 1.7. Has 4 Cal/g or 16 Cal/tsp.
Glucose
Glucose crystals, aka dextrose or corn sugar, is produced from complete hydrolysis of corn starch by acids or enzymes, followed by refining and crystallization. It is about 60% as sweet as table sugar. Sweetness ~ 0.6. Has 4 Cal/g or 16 Cal/tsp
Honey
Most honeys have more fructose (~40%) than glucose (~30%), maltose (0.5-3%) & sucrose (~1%). Plus 4% of other carbohydrates & trace amounts of minerals, vitamins, enzymes. Is nectar concentrated by honeybees to 17% water. Mankind's 1st sweetener dating back at least 26,000 years. Cane sugar production is ~400 y/o. Typically tastes up to 50% sweeter than table sugar. Sweetness = 1-1.5. Provides 20 Cal/teaspoon or 60 Cal/tablespoon. Honey powder is slightly sweeter than table sugar and is 4 Cal/g
Maple Syrup & Sugar
Syrup made by extracting dilute juice from the maple tree, and then boiling off most or all the water. Maple Syrup has about 30% water, 60% sucrose, and small amounts of fructose and glucose. The syrup is about 90% as sweet as table sugar; (Sweetness = 0.9) and provides about 16 Cal/ teaspoon or 50 Cal /tablespoon. Maple Sugar provides 4 Cal/g and is as sweet as table sugar.
Table Syrups & Corn Syrup
Also known as “Table sirup”, “Sirup”, “Pancake sirup”, “Waffle sirup”, “Pancake and waffle sirup”, or “___ sirup”, the blank being filled in with the word or words that designate the sweetening ingredient in the syrup, except “maple”, “cane”, or “sorghum”. The word “sirup” may be spelled “syrup”. Sweet ingredients vary but most contain high fructose corn syrup.
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Copyright © 2020   WhatSugar Blog | By Adriane Mulinari Campos 

Everywhere in the USA | Based in Richmond,VA | Email me at info@whatsugar.com

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